Why we do what we do

Dad – Living with cancer

This is my dad…..he’s got cancer. Well it all goes way back to when he got diagnosed with Type I diabetes. Usually humans get diabetes in pre-teen age but my dad was 29 years old. So when growing up i didn’t pay a lot attention to my dad’s illness as he never complained about it. But that all changed when he got diagnosed with cancer. In the past years i had noticed that my dad’s short term memory was failing.

Dad – Living with cancer

He’d measure his glucose, if high he’d give himself insulin and within 5 minutes he would ask me „did i already inject?”. If a person takes too much insulin at a time, he or she can get killed. So this is serious. So back to 2010….my dad calls me and tells me that he has terrible news. He has cancer and it has spread from his lounges, to his liver, kidneys and brain. It was a shock to all of us, but like always, my dad said „well this thing we will fight and i will do my best to win”. He’s always optimistic about his way of life and does want to live longer. The doctors told us that chemo therapy on his brain would affect his short term memory….and my first thought was „ok, so now he will get himself killed by double dosage of insulin!”. This got me worried as his equipment for his diabetes care doesn’t help him like it should.

Dad – Living with cancer

He has a device to measure glucose and it’s stored on the device, but if he wants to get that info to his PC, he has to install a software from a CD (takes approx. 2-30 minutes), then use a receiver to accept the data via infrared…….so no it’s not for a person like my dad!

So, i know technology pretty well. I’ve been working for Microsoft for the past 9 years. I have a Bsc. in Computer science and i know that something can be done. With that, i now have formed a company, Medilync, and i have a device in the making called Insulync. It’s a new type of device that can measure glucose, inject insulin (based on measurements if needed) and has the skin piercer needed for the glucose measurement. The device saves all the measurements and insulin dosages, syncs that same data to a cloud storage and distributes the data to a web client (or an app) for the user to see his/hers usage over the past day, week, month or year.

Dad – Living with cancer

 I really do hope, that this new technology will get as widespread as possible as it will help a lot of people. One example is that an owner o